Industry - Abandoned

Industry

A listing of abandoned breweries, distilleries, iron furnaces, power plants and other industrial structures in the United States.

IndianaKentuckyMarylandMichiganNew YorkOhioPennsylvaniaTennesseeWest VirginiaIron FurnacesMiscellaneous

Farmers Grain Company (Carlos, Indiana)

Farmers Grain Company

The Farmers Grain Company of Carlos, Indiana was located on the former Indiana, Bloomington & Western Railway.

Location: Carlos, Indiana
Status: Abandoned

Indiana Ammunitions Depot

Indiana Army Ammunition Plant

The Indiana Army Ammunition Plant (INAAP), located southeast of Charlestown, Indiana, was the largest ammunition plant in the United States.

Location: Charlestown, Indiana
Status: Abandoned

Marble Hill Nuclear Power Plant

Marble Hill Nuclear Power Plant

Marble Hill Nuclear Power Plant is an abandoned power generating facility in Marble Hill, Indiana. It was abandoned in 1984 after $2.7 billion was expended.

Location: Marble Hill, Indiana
Status: Demolished

20110709-_DSC4068

Moser Leather Company

The Moser Leather Company manufactured high-grade leather for harnesses and collar manufacturers before expanding into wholesale leather.

Location: New Albany, Indiana
Status: Abandoned

AK Steel Ashland Works

AK Steel Ashland Works

AK Steel Ashland Works, located west of Ashland, Kentucky, features one pig-iron blast furnace, a basic oxygen furnace, continuous caster, coating line and other production facilities.

Location: Russell, Kentucky
Status: Active

Buchanan Fuel Krypton Loadout

Buchanan Fuel Krypton Loadout

The Buchanan Fuel Krypton Loadout is located near a small surface coal mine in Kyrpton, Kentucky.

Location: Krypton, Kentucky
Status: Abandoned

Buffalo Springs Distillery

The Buffalo Springs Distillery, located in Stamping Ground, Kentucky, was first used as a distillery in 1866.

Location: Stamping Ground, Kentucky
Status: Demolished

20070429-20070429-DSC_8117

January and Wood Company

The January and Wood Company, a cotton mill, was located on West Second Street in Maysville, Kentucky.

Location: Maysville, Kentucky
Status: Demolished

Kentucky Fire Brick Company

Kentucky Fire Brick Company

The Louisville & Portsmouth Fire Brick Company established a refractory brick manufacturing plant at Haldeman, Kentucky in 1903. It closed in 1958.

Location: Haldeman, Kentucky
Status: Abandoned

Lee Clay Products

Lee Clay Products

Lee Clay Products, a former brick factory in Clearfield, Kentucky, was in operation until 1970.

Location: Morehead, Kentucky
Status: Active

Louisville Gas and Electric’s Paddy’s Run Power Plant

The Louisville Gas and Electric (LG&E) Paddy’s Run Power Plant is a defunct power generating facility in southwestern Louisville, Kentucky, located at the confluence of Paddy’s Run stream and the Ohio River. Planning for the coal-fired power plant in the Rubbertown district of the city began in the 1930s, when the majority of the 140 antiquated steam power plants that dotted the city only decades prior were being phased out.

Location: Louisville, Kentucky
Status: Abandoned

Louisville Varnish Company

Location: Louisville, Kentucky
Status: Abandoned

Old Crow Distillery

Old Crow Distillery

Located in Kentucky, Old Crow Distillery once produced Old Grand Dad, Bourbon DeLuxe, Sunny Brook and other bourbon beverages. The plant closed in 1987 as a result of a buy-out from competitor Jim Bean.

Location: Frankfort, Kentucky
Status: Under Renovations

20140802-_DSC6353

Old Louis Hunter Distillery

The Old Louis Hunter Distillery, located in Lair, Kentucky along the banks of the South Fork Licking River, operated from around 1850 until 1974.

Location: Lair, Kentucky
Status: Abandoned

20101120-_DSC0025

Old Taylor Distillery

Old Taylor Distillery, located south of Frankfort, Kentucky along Glenn’s Creek, was constructed by E.H. Taylor, Jr. in 1887. Old Taylor was known for being the first to produce one million cases of straight bourbon whiskey. The complex is currently being restored for Castle & Key, an upstart distillery.

Location: Frankfort, Kentucky
Status: Active

Olive Hill Fire Brick Company

Located within a very rich clay deposit, fire brick was produced for decades in Olive Hill, Kentucky that was shipped worldwide.

Location: Olive Hill, Kentucky
Status: Abandoned

Parker Tobacco Company

Parker Tobacco Company

Parker Tobacco Company was tobacco redrying and threshing plant that became a large tobacco leaf purchasing, processing, marketing and commercial storage operation in Maysville, Kentucky.

Location: Maysville, Kentucky
Status: Demolished

Texas Company Oil Refinery

Texola, Kentucky was home to a Texas Company Oil Refinery from 1920 until 1945.

Location: Texola, Kentucky
Status: Abandoned

T.W. Samuels Distillery

T.W. Samuels Distillery

The T.W. Samuels Distillery, located in Deatsville, Kentucky, produced its signature “T.W. Samuels” bottle and a four year-old 90-proof label.

Location: Deatsville, Kentucky
Status: Abandoned

20150117-_DSC5989

Tygart Limestone Company

The Lawton Limestone Company was located in Lawton, Kentucky along the Chesapeake & Ohio Railroad. It later became the Tygart Limestone Company, which opened an underground mine that grew to 2.6 million square feet in size. After the mine closed, the tunnels were used to grow mushrooms. An ill-fated attempt in the 2000’s to convert the mines into a data center ended when it was discovered the high-tech data storage company was fraudulent.

Location: Lawton, Kentucky
Status: Abandoned

Lonaconing Silk Mill

Lonaconing Silk Mill

The Lonaconing Silk Mill, also referred to as the Klotz Throwing Company, is the last intact silk mill in the United States.

Location: Lonaconing, Maryland
Status: Closed

Detroit Harbor Terminals

Detroit Harbor Terminals

Detroit Harbor Terminals is located along the Detroit River in Detroit, Michigan. Prior to the completion of the terminal, most of the commodities and raw materials used in Detroit were shipped first by water to Cleveland, Chicago, or Toledo and shipped to Detroit via rail. Construction of a ten-story, 900,000 square feet building, of reinforced concrete, was the largest on the Great Lakes when it opened on March 15, 1926. The new building was designed by famed architect Albert Kahn and his firm.

Location: Detroit, Michigan
Status: Abandoned

Fisher Body Company

Fisher Body Company Plant 21

The Fisher Body Company Plant No. 21 is located in Detroit, Michigan and formerly produced automobile bodies for General Motors. The building has been abandoned since 1993.

Location: Detroit, Michigan
Status: Abandoned

Packard Automotive Plant

Packard Automotive Plant

The Packard Automotive Plant is a former automobile manufacturing facility in Detroit, Michigan, known for its infamous slogan, “Ask the Man Who Owns One,” and its luxurious automobiles. Constructed in 1903, the factory employed 40,000 at its peak before closing in 1958. Portions of the complex remained in operation for other businesses until 2010.

Location: Detroit, Michigan
Status: Abandoned

Van Nattas Pumping Station

Van Nattas Pumping Station

The Van Nattas Pumping Station, located in Ithaca, New York, was constructed by the Ithaca Light & Water Company in 1893. It was built on the site of the Van Natta & Jones Mill.

Location: Ithaca, New York
Status: Abandoned

Alpha Portland Cement Company

Alpha Portland Cement Company

Alpha Portland Cement Company is a former cement manufacturing plant in Ironton, Ohio. Abandoned for decades, the complex was demolished in 2010.

Location: Ironton, Ohio
Status: Demolished

Ault and Wiborg Company

Ault and Wiborg Company

The Ault and Wiborg Company had a factory located at 417 East 7th Street in downtown Cincinnati, Ohio that was built in 1930 for the Queen City Printing Company, a manufacturer of printing inks and dry color dyes and pigments that innovated the industry with coal-tar dyes. It was demolished in 2009.

Location: Cincinnati, Ohio
Status: Demolished

Buckeye Ordnance Works

The Buckeye Ordnance Works, in operation for only three years during World War II in South Point, Ohio, manufactured ammonium nitrate explosives.

Location: South Point, Ohio
Status: Demolished

Carlyle Labold Tile and Brick Company

Carlyle Labold Tile and Brick Company

The Carlyle Labold Tile and Brick Company, located in Petersburg (Coal Grove), Ohio, was a tile and brick manufacturer.

Location: Coal Grove, Ohio
Status: Demolished

Cavanaugh Company

Cavanaugh Company

The Cavanaugh Company, a hardware wholesale supply company, was located in Youngstown, Ohio.

Location: Youngstown, Ohio
Status: Abandoned

City Mills

City Mills

The City Mills Building, located in Mansfield, Ohio, served as a warehouse for a railroad and then as a mill.

Location: Mansfield, Ohio
Status: Renovated

Champion Paper

Champion Paper

Champion Paper, which later became Champion International Paper, International Paper and then Smart Papers, was a paper mill in Hamilton, Ohio.

Location: Hamilton, Ohio
Status: Demolished / Renovated

Clyffside Brewing Company

Clyffside Brewing Company

Clyffside Brewing Company is a defunct brewery in Cincinnati, Ohio, which began in 1933 in the former Mohawk Brewery. The company’s signature selections included Felsenbrau beer and Old Hickory Ale that was “aged in the hills.”

Location: Cincinnati, Ohio
Status: Abandoned

Consolidated Grain

Consolidated Grain

Consolidated Grain was located along Beekman Street in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Location: Cincinnati, Ohio
Status: Partially Demolished

Crosley Building

Crosley Building

The Crosley Radio Corporation, which was the largest manufacturer of table-top radios in the United States, was based in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Location: Cincinnati, Ohio
Status: Abandoned

Crowell-Collier Publishing Company

Crowell-Collier Publishing Company

The printing operation for the Crowell-Collier Publishing Company, once the world’s largest magazine publishing house, was located on High Street in Springfield, Ohio. The editorial, circulation, and business offices were located in Chicago and New York.

Location: Springfield, Ohio
Status: Partially Demolished

Ferry Cap and Screw Company

Ferry Cap and Screw Company

The Ferry Cap and Screw Company manufactures cold-headed, high- strength precision fasteners for trucks, power generators and construction and industrial markets.

Location: Cleveland, Ohio
Status: Abandoned

Frank Sherman Company

Frank Sherman Company

The Frank Sherman Company was a former scrap metal dealer in Youngstown, Ohio.

Location: Youngstown, Ohio
Status: Abandoned

Harding-Jones Paper Company

Harding-Jones Paper Company

The Harding-Jones Paper Company, located in Excello, Ohio, is an early example of the paper manufacturing industry.

Location: Excello, Ohio
Status: Abandoned

Hudepohl Brewing Company

Hudepohl Brewing Company

Founded in Over-the-Rhine, Cincinnati, Ohio in 1885, the Hudepohl Brewing Company brewed golden lager, dark lager, seasonal bock beer and several regional styles of lager that were popular in Germany. The company later relocated to a brewery in Queensgate that was formerly home to Herman Leckman Brewing Company. Hudepohl vacated the factory in 1987 when it merged with the Schoenling Brewing Company.

Location: Cincinnati, Ohio
Status: Abandoned

Joseph & Feiss Company

Joseph & Feiss Company

The Joseph & Feiss Company, located in Cleveland, Ohio, is the oldest manufacturer of tailored apparel for men in the United States.

Location: Cleveland, Ohio
Status: Abandoned

Kauffman Brewing Company

Kauffman Brewing Company

The Kauffman Brewing Co., a defunct brewery at 1622 Vine Street in Over-the-Rhine in Cincinnati, Ohio, closed during Prohibition and never reopened.

Location: Cincinnati, Ohio
Status: Closed

Lempco Industries

Lempco Industries

Lempco, an industrial facility located in New Lexington, Ohi, manufactured die sets, guiding components and springs for the automotive industry.

Location: New Lexington, Ohio
Status: Abandoned

The Mechanical Rubber Company

The Mechanical Rubber Company

Collected in several lots at Lisbon and Evins Street in Cleveland, Ohio were several notable industries, including the Cleveland Rubber Company.

Location: Cleveland, Ohio
Status: Demolished

National Acme

National Acme

National Acme, located in Cleveland, Ohio, was one of the largest manufacturers of machine tools in the United States.

Location: Cleveland, Ohio
Status: Abandoned

New Boston Coke Corporation

New Boston Coke Corporation

The New Boston Coke Corporation, once part of the Portsmouth Steel complex in New Boston, Ohio, employed nearly 5,000 during its height.

Location: New Boston, Ohio
Status: Demolished

20100705-_DSC2153

Ohio Edison

The Ohio Edison power plant was located along the Mad River and the National Road in Springfield, Ohio, and was demolished in 2010.

Location: Springfield, Ohio
Status: Demolished

Ohio Edison (Toronto, Ohio)

Ohio Edison

A major coal-fired power plant in Toronto, Ohio that has been demolished.

Location: Toronto, Ohio
Status: Demolished

Peter's Cartridge Company

Peters Cartridge Company

Peter’s Cartridge Company is a former smokeless ordnance and shot shell ammunition factory in Kings Mill, Ohio. Located along the Little Miami River, the 71-acre Peters Cardridge factory began production of ordnance in 1887, ending in 1944.

Location: Kings Mill, Ohio
Status: Under Renovations

Plibricore Refractories

Plibricore Refractories

Located in the tiny community of Blackfork, Ohio, Plibricore Refractories was a former brick factory that begun its operations in the early-1900s.

Location: Blackfork, Ohio
Status: Demolished

The Portsmouth Brewing and Ice Company

The Portsmouth Brewing and Ice Company

The Portsmouth Brewing and Ice Company is a defunct brewery in Portsmouth, Ohio.

Location: Portsmouth, Ohio
Status: Demolished

20130627-_DSC0442-merge

Republic Rubber

The Republic Rubber Company was located in Youngstown, Ohio and manufactured tires and hoses for the automotive and aerospace industries. At its peak, Republic employed 2,300 with a payroll of $4 million. The facility closed in 1989.

Location: Youngstown, Ohio
Status: Abandoned

20100719-_DSC3109

Reymann Brewing Company

Reymann Brewery, part of the Wheeling’s rich German heritage that date to the 19th century, was one of the largest breweries in the state.

Location: Wheeling, West Virginia
Status: Abandoned

Richman Brothers

Richman Brothers

The Richman Brothers Company was a manufacturer and distributor of men’s suits, furnishings and hats. It operated a national network of stores, a tailoring plant and office complex.

Location: Cleveland, Ohio
Status: Abandoned

Schmidt Brothers Brewery

Schmidt Brothers Brewery

Schmidt Brothers Brewery is a defunct brewery located in Cincinnati, Ohio.It was founded by Friedrich and Heinrich Schmidt and brewed what they referred to as the “common ale” of the city.

Location: Cincinnati, Ohio
Status: Abandoned

Selby Shoe Company

Selby Shoe Company

The Selby Shoe Company opened a four-story factory along South Third Street in Ironton, Ohio in 1926. The facility was purchased in 1943 by the Wilson Athletic Goods Mfg. Co.

Location: Ironton, Ohio
Status: Abandoned

Springfield Metallic Casket Company

Springfield Metallic Casket Company

The Springfield Metallic Casket Company was located in Springfield, Ohio. Established in 1884, the factory was the largest producer of metallic caskets in the United States.

Location: Springfield, Ohio
Status: Abandoned

Stearns and Foster Company

Stearns and Foster Company

Once the largest cotton consumer in the United States, this aged factory in Lockland, Ohio underwent new management and promptly began downsizing and eventually closed this location’s doors for good in 2003.

Location: Lockland, Ohio
Status: Demolished

Marquette Cement Manufacturing Company

Superior Portland Cement Company

The Superior Portland Cement Company was located in Superior, Ohio along the Detroit, Toledo & Ironton Railroad.

Location: Superior, Ohio
Status: Demolished

20150726-_DSC6770

Tip Top Cereal Company

The Tip Top Cereal Company was located on Canal Road in Cleveland, Ohio.

Location: Cleveland, Ohio
Status: Abandoned

Warner & Swasey Company

Warner & Swasey Company

The Warner & Swasey Company is a former manufacturer of machine tools, instruments, and specialty equipment, best known for its astronomical telescopes and turret lathes for astronomical observatories and military installations. Founded as a partnership in 1880 by Worcester Reed Warner and Ambrose Swasey, the main factory was located in Cleveland, Ohio.

Location: Cleveland, Ohio
Status: Abandoned

20130627-_DSC0595

Wean United

Wean United was located at 219 South Phelps Street in Youngstown, Ohio. It was a manufacturer of equipment that was used to process and finish flat rolled steel, steel and iron rolls, iron castings, coupling boxes, annealing bottoms and boxes and steam hydraulic forging presses. It was equipped to produce castings and rolls weighing up to 100 tons.

Location: Youngstown, Ohio
Status: Partially Demolished

Van Dorn Iron Works

Van Dorn Iron Works

The Van Dorn Iron Works was located at 2685-2700 East 79th Street in the Kinsman neighborhood of Cleveland, Ohio. The manufacturing plant relocated in 1991.

Location: Cleveland, Ohio
Status: Demolished

Jeannette Glass

Jeannette Glass

The Jeannette Glass Company, located in Jeannette, Pennsylvania, was in operation from 1887 until 1983.

Location: Jeannette, Pennsylvania
Status: Abandoned

Shenango China

Shenango China Company

Shenango China was once one of America’s great restaurantware and dinnerware manufacturers. Located in New Castle, Pennsylvania, Shenango produced Incaware, “Castleton China” and “American Haviland,” along with other brands and styles.

Location: New Castle, Pennsylvania
Status: Abandoned

Victor Brewing Company

Victor Brewing Company

The Victor Brewing Company, located in Jeannette, Pennsylvania, was in operation from 1908 to 1941.

Location: Jeannette, Pennsylvania
Status: Abandoned

Fisk University Steam Plant

The Fisk University steam plant was located in Nashville, Tennessee.

Location: Nashville, Tennessee
Status: Abandoned

Barboursville Clay Manufacturing Company

Barboursville Clay Manufacturing Company

The Barboursville Clay Manufacturing Company operated from 1904 to 1979 in Barboursville, West Virginia.

Location: Barboursville, West Virginia
Status: Demolished

Fostoria Glass

Fostoria Glass Company

Fostoria Glass Company, located in Moundsville, West Virginia, was the largest manufacturer of handmade glassware in the United States.

Location: Moundsville, West Virginia
Status: Demolished

Pantasote

Located within the heavily polluted West Virginia Ordnance Works facility, this small manufacturer of resins had its own wealth of environmental problems.

Location: West Virginia
Status: Abandoned

Pilgrim Glass Company

The Pilgrim Glass Company was located in Ceredo, West Virginia and was founded in 1949 by Alfred Knobler after he acquired the Tri-State Glass Manufacturing Company. Early production pieces of Pilgrim included hand-blown crackle glass, although the company became known for their cranberry glass, which was a temperamental combination of gold and lead oxide, that led Pilgrim to become the largest producer of cranberry in the world. After not finding a buyer for the business, Knobler closed Pilgrim Glass in 2002.

Location: Ceredo, West Virginia
Status: Renovated

20100718-_DSC2868

Schmulbach Brewery

Schmulbach Brewery, located in Wheeling, West Virginia, was once an integral part of the city’s rich German heritage that dates to the 19th century.

Location: Wheeling, West Virginia
Status: Closed

The Hanging Rock region of southern Ohio and Kentucky produced a significant amount of iron in the United States for mills in the manufacture of steel. Skip to: Hanging Rock – Southern Ohio and Kentucky.

Hanging Rock – Southern Ohio

Between the 1830’s and the early 1900’s, the Hanging Rock region of southern Ohio produced a significant amount of iron in the United States. There were numerous furnaces in the region, generally east of Portsmouth, south of Jackson and north of Ironton, and employed several hundred at each site. Unfortunately, the iron extracted were generally high in sulfur content and in general, the furnaces were not that profitable.

Buckeye Furnace

Buckeye Furnace was constructed in 1851 several miles north of Keystone and east of Wellston.1 The furnace was financed by Newkirk, Daniels & Company and constructed by Thomas Price 3 shortly before the XXXX railroad was completed into Jackson County, and when it was finished, several hundred tons of iron had been hauled to Jackson to await the first train. In 1862, the furnace was sold to H.S. Bundy, the Perry Austin & Company in 1864 and to the Buckeye  Furnace Company in 1867.1 The Buckeye Furnace Company was operated by Eben Jones, John D. Davis, L.T. Hughes and Dr. S. Williams.

The furnace initially produced 7.5 tons of iron per day and operated 42 weeks out of the year.3 The stack was later raised to 34-feet with a 11-foot bosh which increased the output to 12 tons of iron per day.

The Buckeye Furnace operated until 1894.3

20120422-_DSC4397

Buckhorn Furnace

Buckhorn Furnace was constructed by the Seeley Willard and Company in 1833/1836, and had a capacity of 15 tons per day.

Cambria Furnace

Cambria Furnace is located east of Samsonville (Blackfork Station) in southern Jackson County. The furnace was organized on March 1, 1854 with an initial capital of $60,000, with shares at $120 with 60 stockholders, all Welshmen.1 Some farmers donated land to pay for their shares, and were given $15 per acre of land.4 D. Lewis & Company operated Cambria.1

The furnace produced seven to eight tons of iron per day.4 The stack was 30.5-feet high with a 10.5-foot bosh.

Cambria was not successful. It had been weakened by the Panic of 1857 and the operator did not capitalize on the high iron prices of the Civil War. The last blast was in 1878.1

Franklin Furnace

Franklin Furnace was located on Lot 21 of the French Grant in Green Township of Scioto County.2 It was constructed from 1826 to 1827 with a 28-foot-high stack with a 9.5-foot bosh 5 by Daniel and John Young, Jesse Y. Whitcomb, Josiah Merrill, John Hurd and Martin Ruter, all from New Hampshire.2 Daniel Young had formed the Ohio Iron Company a few years earlier to operate their iron business, and about four years after beginning operations, it was sold to John Young and Van Horn.

A community of 350 developed around Franklin Furnace; most homes were log cabins, and the town included stores, a blacksmith shop, church and school.2

By 1832, Franklin was producing ten tons of iron daily, and was converted to hot blast in 1836.2 During that year, the furnace buildings were burned down and rebuilt shortly afterwards. It was then sold to A.J. Rogers and Company, who sold out to Jefferson W. Glidden and John Blair in 1841. The Portsmouth Tribune of July 8, 1842 noted that Glidden had purchased John Blair’s interest in the furnace and became its sole owner.

John Gould and Jesse and Jacob Hurd were the next to own the furnace.2 Because of domestic relations, John Gould purchased the furnace outright. His brother, Orin B. Gould, Sr., had a minor interest in the furnace at that time.

During the Mexican War, John Gould made a fortune from the furnace and turned over his interest in the property to Orin in 1850 who operated it until 1860 when it was blown out.2

During Franklin’s run, approximately 50,000 to 60,000 tons of pig iron, worth $1.5 million, was produced.2 At its peak, three steamboats were kept busy hauling the pig iron from the Franklin and Junior Furnaces to Portsmouth where most of it was used in the rolling mill and foundries, and some were shipped by the Erie Canal to northern and eastern markets.

Sandstone blocks from the furnace were removed by Charles Goddard in 1888. Goddard, superintendent of Ohio’s public works, used the rocks to repair the Erie Canal Locks at Three Locks.2 Only a few stones were left remaining and used as foundation for a schoolhouse that was later built on the furnace site.

Iron Valley/Lincoln/Cornelia Furnace

The Iron Valley Furnace was located east of Jackson at the Vinton County border, and was constructed in 1853 out of natural crack on a stone cliff.6 The furnace, with a 38-foot-high stack with a 11-foot bosh, had a capacity of 12 tons per day.

In 1858, Iron Valley was sold to the Iron Valley Furnace Company and then leased to William McGhee and William Ratcliff in 1961.6 McGhee bought out Ratcliff two years later and changed the name of the furnace to Lincoln. It was later changed to Cornelia in honor of McGhee’s only daughter.

Cornelia Furnace closed in 1885.6

Jackson Furnace

Jackson Furnace was constructed in 1836 by J. Hurd, Young and others 7 near the southern border of Jackson County.1 Jackson featured a 40-foot-tall stack with a 9.5-foot bosh,7 and featured the first steam engine in the county.1 Due to the Panic of 1837, the owners were forced to sell out to Ellison, Tewksberry & Company who operated it until 1874.

Keystone Furnace

Keystone Furnace was constructed in 1848 on the Little Raccoon south of Jackson with funding from several Scioto and Lawrence capitalists,1 including John Campbell and S. McConnel and named for a large riverboat on the Ohio River that was owned by the proprietors.7 The furnace was built by John McConnell & Company 1 and featured a 33-foot stack with a 10-foot bosh, and produced 12 tons of iron per day.7

Early on, A.F. and P.M. McCarley made attempts to float finished product down the Raccoon Creek to the Ohio River with boats that measured 60- to 85-feet by 16- to 20-feet, each hauling 55 tons with a crew of four.7

Keystone furnace was succeeded by the Green Benner & Company in 1853,1 who enlarged the stack to 36-feet and increased its daily production tonnage to 24.7 The furnace was closed between 1861 and 1863 as the owners elected to form the 27th Ohio Volunteer Infantry and participated in the Civil War. Keystone was purchased Hezekiah Sanford Bundy in 1871. The furnace closed in 1885.

Jefferson Furnace

The original capital for the Jefferson Furnace was $60,000.1 Jefferson had a two ton capacity. Iron was hauled to Oak Hill on a railroad about 2.5 miles east of the furnace.

Latrobe Furnace

Latrobe Furnace was the sixth furnace constructed in the region and was organized in 1854 with $60,000 in stock.1 Named for a Frenchman and constructed by Welshmen, Latrobe was built six miles east of Kackson on the proposed Cincinnati and Hillsboro Railroad which was never completed.

Limestone Furnace

Limestone Furnace was located a few miles north of Madison on the Grassy Fork of Symmes Creek.1 A few stockholders were Welshmen and the furnace was constructed in 1854 by Evans, Walterhouse & Company. Riley Corn, a wealthy farmer, bought out a number of the stockholders in 1856, but Limestone closed within a few years.

Madison Furnace

Madison Furnace was built along the Grassy Fork of Symmes Creek in Madison Township in 1854 by John P. Terry, John Peters and others.1 The furnace later passed to the E.D. Ricker & Company, Peter Clare & Company and Clare, Duduit and Company, all controlled by J.D. Clare. The mine was served by a branch of the Cincinnati, Hamilton and Dayton Railroad, and hauled its iron to Clay on the Portsmouth Branch when it made its first shipment in July 1854.

The Madison Furnace operated for 50 years.

Monroe Furnace

Monroe Furnace was constructed in 1854 and owned by John Campbell, and John and Isaac Peters. The Peters brothers sold their interest in 1866. William M. Bolles and others became active in the management afterwards.1

Monroe Furnace closed in the 1880s.

Oak Ridge Furnace

The Oak Ridge Furnace was constructed from 1856 to August 1857, and originally used charcoal as the primary source of fuel.9 It was converted to run on coal in May 1858 and closed soon after. It had a 44-foot stack with a 11-foot bosh, and produced 15 tons of iron per day.

Olive Furnace

Olive Furnace was constructed by John Campbell and John Peters in 1846, and had a 37-foot stack with a 9-foot bosh.10 It produced 16 tons of iron per day at its peak.

Orange Furnace

Orange Furnace was proposed by Peter Pickrel, Lewis Davis, David D. Dungan and Alanson Robbins in 1853, but was not completed until 1864.1

Salt Lick Furnace

Salt Lick Furnace was constructed in 1854 near Jackson and was owned by R.C. Hoffman, J.J. Hoffman, Alexander Gratton, Moses Sternberger, Patrick Murdock and the Stewart brothers.1 It was later renamed to Gideon and then Diamond. Smith, Tod & Company became owners in 1864.

Salt Lick was the first furnace to use stone coal for fuel.1

Vesuvius Furnace

Vesuvius Furnace

Vesuvius Furnace was constructed in 1836 by William Firmstone and was the first hot blast furnace in the southern Ohio region.

Young America Furnace

Young America Furnace was constructed in Lick Township in 1856, and was headed by James H. Miller.1 The furnace was not a success and was out of blast by 1860. Some of its machinery was used in the completion of Orange Furnace in Jackson.


Kentucky

Fitchburg Furnace

Fitchburg Furnace

Fitchburg Furnace, also known as the Red River Furnace, was constructed in 1869.

Slate Furnace

Slate Furnace

Slate Furnace was located south of Owingsville, Kentucky along what is today’s State Route 36. It was the first of its kind west of the Allegheny Mountains.

Sources