In Focus

In Focus By On October 29, 2014

Foxy Shazam Disbanding

It was announced today that the American rock band, Foxy Shazam, is disbanding for an unknown period of time. I am under the assumption that after performing more than 2,000 shows, the band members just need some time to breathe and be with their families.

One of my favorite music videos, for I Like It, from the aptly named The Church of Rock and Roll, was filmed in the abandoned First German Reformed Church in the West End neighborhood of Cincinnati – their hometown.

In Focus By On May 15, 2014

Our Savior

Listed on the National Register of Historic Places due to its amazing architecture, the Woodward Avenue Presbyterian Church in Detroit needs to be saved.

In Focus By On May 11, 2014

Waveland

Waveland was constructed between 1797 and 1800 in Danville, Kentucky. After being abandoned for several decades, it is slated for restoration.

In Focus By On April 14, 2014

Gymnasium

Constructed in 1888 with an addition of a gymnasium in 1918, the Windsor School was located in the Walnut Hills neighborhood of Cincinnati, Ohio.

In Focus By On April 11, 2014

Out of School

School had been out for just a few months when this photograph was taken of the former Fairmont School in Cincinnati, Ohio.

In Focus By On April 2, 2014

Brooks was here

Dear fellas, I can’t believe how fast things move on the outside. I saw an automobile once when I was a kid, but now they’re everywhere. The world went and got itself in a big damn hurry. The parole board got me into this halfway house called “The Brewer” and a job bagging groceries at the Foodway. It’s hard work…

In Focus By On March 31, 2013

Ashland

This Ashland Gasoline Station is located along KY 15 in Jackson, Kentucky and is in danger of being demolished.

In Focus By On February 11, 2013

Neel, Ohio

Deep within the hills in Neel, Ohio lies an abandoned country market and the remains of a covered span that was washed away in 1997.

In Focus By On December 28, 2012

New Boston Coke

New Boston Coke was once part of the Portsmouth Steel complex that employed nearly 5,000 during its height in the mid-20th century.

In Focus By On December 6, 2012

Ruins

The ruins of downtown Wheeling, West Virginia. Nearly an entire block of historic buildings – some of them very recently occupied, has been cleared for parking and grassy lots. Across the street, more historic building stock was cleared in the summer for more open space.

In Focus By On January 9, 2012

Orangeburg House

Located along Stone Lick Creek north of Orangeburg, Kentucky is this quaint and simple farmhouse has newer gingerbread detailing.

In Focus By On December 21, 2011

Deerton, Michigan

Deerton, Michigan is an unincorporated community in Alger County that was founded in 1882 when the Detroit, Mackinac & Marquette Railroad constructed a station for a lumbering camp. A post office opened in 1922, and in 1926, a small school was constructed at the junction of Deerton-Onota Road. Today, not much is left in the community – most of the residences are abandoned, although the school still operates.

In Focus By On December 14, 2011

Springfield, Ohio’s Arcade

Noted as the second oldest arcade in the United States, Springfield, Ohio’s downtown Arcade was demolished in 1988. The Arcade was adjacent to the Esplanade, and was a leading example of Romanesque, Italianate and Monumental architecture. It was bounded by S. Fountain Ave., E. High Street, Washington Street and Primrose Alley.

In Focus By On November 28, 2011

American Car and Foundry Company

While spending a rainy day at a library, I managed to find some information on the now closed American Car and Foundry Company manufacturing company in Huntington, West Virginia, that dated back to November 1, 1872 when it was issued a charter as the Ensign Manufacturing Company. It is nearly as old as the city itself!

In Focus By On November 21, 2011

Packard Motors

The Packard Motor Company on East Grand Boulevard in Detroit, Michigan was constructed in 1903 and closed in 1958. With just the exception of a brief reuse in several locations, the entire complex – 3.5 million square feet over 35 acres, produced 1.5 million vehicles. Designed by Albert Kahn, the industrial complex used reinforced concrete for its construction, a first for Detroit.