Gamble House Is No More

Nestled in the Westwood neighborhood of Cincinnati, Ohio, at 2918 Werk Road, stood the Gamble House, an imposing 2 1/2-story, 13-room residence that embodied the grandeur of the Queen Anne style.






Nestled in the Westwood neighborhood of Cincinnati, Ohio, at 2918 Werk Road, stood the Gamble House, an imposing 2 1/2-story, 13-room residence that embodied the grandeur of the Queen Anne style. Constructed in 1875 by James Norris Gamble on the site of his father’s earlier dwelling, the house was a testament to the era when country estates dotted the western reaches of the region.

Gamble, an inventor and humanitarian, and the son of Procter & Gamble’s co-founder, resided in the vast 2,644-square-foot abode for 57 years until his passing in 1932. His daughter, Olivia, continued to call the house home until her demise in the 1960s, after which ownership was transferred to the Greenacres Foundation of Indian Hill, founded and headed by philanthropist Louise Nippert. Nippert’s late husband, Louis Nippert, was Gamble’s grandson.

In February 2010, preservationists were jolted by the alarming news that the Greenacres Foundation had requested a demolition permit for the Gamble House. What ensued was a protracted three-year tango with city hall, punctuated by litigation, protests, and intense media scrutiny. Despite the valiant efforts of preservationists, the inexorable march of progress could not be halted, and demolition of the historic residence commenced on April 1.

As the dust settles on the rubble of this once-grand edifice, we are left to ponder the sacrifices made in the name of modernity and the irreplaceable loss of our architectural heritage. The Gamble House stood not merely as a physical structure but as a living embodiment of our shared history, a testament to the pioneering spirit that shaped our great city.

While progress is inevitable, it need not come at the expense of our collective memory. It is our solemn duty to strike a delicate balance, preserving the treasures of our past while simultaneously embracing the promise of the future. For in doing so, we not only honor those who came before us but also enshrine their legacy for generations yet to come.

As we bid a sorrowful farewell to the Gamble House, may its demise serve as a clarion call, a reminder of the imperative to vigilantly safeguard the architectural tapestry that weaves together the rich narrative of our community. Only through such steadfast stewardship can we ensure that the echoes of our history reverberate through the ages, indelibly etched upon the landscape of our city.






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It is my true belief that there is a dark past with the Nipperts. There must be some sad secret that they wanted gone with the house. I have heard rumors and now believe there might be something to them. Green Acres, the board members and Carter Randolph should be ashamed. In my opinion, they have gone against there own mission statement and should be investigated.

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